Archive

Archive for July, 2014

Price of gold set to rise as price fixing under review

July 8th, 2014 No comments

Australia Gold Necklace3

The  price is mentioned every night on the news but now the bizarre, ancient method of setting it is up for review following a major rigging scandal.

LONDON’S century-old gold price fixing, tainted by a rigging scandal and attacked by critics as old-fashioned, goes under the spotlight this week in key talks aimed at modernising the process.

Analysts said that the market price of gold, which is driven by investment and jewellery demand, could climb as a result of an overhaul.

Buyers and sellers of the precious metal will meet in London on Monday to discuss the setting of the global benchmark, which affects the flow of billions of dollars worldwide every day. The World Gold Council (WGC) will host an eagerly-awaited forum with retail and central banks, exchanges, mining firms, refiners, traders and other industry groups, while Britain’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) watchdog will attend as an observer. The benchmark gold price is set by four banks at 10:30am London time (0930 GMT) and 3:00pm, via teleconference.

The banks — Britain’s Barclays and HSBC, Canada’s Scotiabank and Societe Generale of France — are all members of the Gold Fixing Company and agree the price twice daily. Germany’s Deutsche Bank pulled out of the panel earlier this year.

The process begins with the so-called spot price of gold, which is based on the current market rate of contracts for physical delivery of the metal.

The four banks must then declare whether they are interested in buying or selling at this level. The price can fluctuate depending on the balance of supply and demand, and settles on a so-called “fixing”.

The system lurched into crisis this year when Barclays was fined more than 26 million ($45 million, 33 million euros) by the FCA after an ex-trader at the troubled bank admitted attempting to manipulate the gold price.

Barclays is among several banks fined billions of dollars by regulators for foreign exchange rigging, prompting a broad review of how global financial benchmarks are set.

Critics argue the gold-price fixing process is also open to abuse.

“It lacks transparency, which means prices can be rigged to benefit banks, at the expense of producers, traders, investors, jewellers and other market participants,” said Mark O’Byrne, research director at broker GoldCore.

“Prices should be determined by market forces of supply and demand and not due to a bank’s determination.” The process is little changed since its creation on September 12, 1919, when the Gold Fixing Company’s five founders — including NM Rothschild & Sons — agreed one single daily price fix in British pounds.

O’Byrne added: “The gold fix is anachronistic in the modern technological age of electronic trading and a move to electronic trading seems inevitable. At the same time, this will not be a panacea as oversight and transparency remains important.” Caroline Bain, senior commodities economist at research consultancy Capital Economics, said transparency was needed to prevent price rigging.

Prices had rocketed to an all-time peak of $2052 per ounce in September 2011 on fears of a fresh global recession amid the raging eurozone debt crisis.

The market could return once more to such levels if the fixing system is overhauled, according to O’Byrne.

“We believe that a more transparent and reliable fixing could lead to higher gold prices as we suspect that prices are artificially low at this time and do not reflect the delicate supply demand balance in the physical gold market,” he told AFP. “Nor do they capture the degree of systemic and geopolitical risk in the world today.”

Read more here: http://tinyurl.com/khj7x7c

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

GOLD Investment Seminar

July 7th, 2014 No comments

gold

New to #Gold?

Last chance for early bird tickets!

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to hear from Jordan Eliseo, one of Australia’s leading economic analysts, speaking about Gold and why it’s becoming a preferred investment for many Australians. 

http://lnkd.in/bAHfGGC